37.51 F
London
February 24, 2024
PI Global Investments
Infrastructure

Evidence sought to inform research project on local civil society infrastructure


the corner of a ringbound notebook and a silver penthe corner of a ringbound notebook and a silver pen

A call for evidence has been issued to inform year-long research on local civil society infrastructure (LCSI).

The research project is being conducted by Pro Bono Economics (PBE), in partnership with Ipsos UK and the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR) at Sheffield Hallam University. It is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and follows calls by PBE for a “root and branch review” of LCSI, as part of the Law Family Commission on Civil Society.

LCSI explained

LCSI consists of place-based organisations including Councils for Voluntary Service (CVSs), Volunteer Centres and Community Foundations, and supports and promotes CSOs by providing advice, guidance and development training; promoting collaboration; providing sector leadership locally, and/or helping to promote volunteering.

Advertisement

Why your supporters are wealthier than you think... Course by Catherine Miles. Background photo of two sides of a terraced street of houses.Why your supporters are wealthier than you think... Course by Catherine Miles. Background photo of two sides of a terraced street of houses.

Recent research by 360Giving shows a decline in spending on LCSI.

How to respond to the call for evidence

The call for evidence is an opportunity for anyone with evidence, insight or knowledge of LCSI to submit literature or evidence they feel is relevant to the four research questions:

  • Which organisations make up local civil society infrastructure in England, and what do they do?
  • How can we measure whether there is sufficient coverage and quality of local civil society infrastructure in local areas in England?
  • What is the impact of local civil society infrastructure in England, who benefits from it and what are the consequences and costs where it is absent or fragile?
  • What are the most effective ways of strengthening and improving local civil society infrastructure?

Evidence can be submitted via the PBE website. The deadline is Friday 26 January.

Jack Larkham, Senior Research and Policy Analyst at PBE, said:

“Having called for a ‘root and branch review’ of local civil society infrastructure as part of the Law Family Commission on Civil Society, we are delighted to be partnering with Ipsos and CRESR to deliver this vital and timely research and are grateful to DCMS for their support.

 

“This call for evidence provides the opportunity for anyone with research or insight into local civil society infrastructure in England to contribute to this important work and will help to ensure that the diversity and complexity of this subject matter is properly explored. Thank you in advance to anyone who takes the time to contribute.”

LoadingLoading



Source link

Related posts

Free ‘Bootcamps’ Help Small Cities Secure Federal Grants for Infrastructure

D.William

With so much development, can Port St. Lucie’s infrastructure handle growth?

D.William

93% of Ukrainian agricultural exports exit Ukraine by sea, river

D.William

Leave a Comment

* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.